TRADING CARD GAME (version 2.51)

About TCG.

TCG supports multiple languages, including Traditional Chinese and English. You may freely switch to your prefer language when you start the game client.

You can play this game via two ways:

  1. 1. Click here to download the latest version of game client (.exe) for Windows
  2. 2. Click here to download and install Adobe Flash Player 11.1 on your Android device (NOTE: new tablet devices with latest Android OS may no longer have built-in Flash player, in such case, you may need to download and install Adobe Flash Player by yourself. Due to Google Play Market also no long has Adobe Flash Player, you need to download this apk here. Before you start installing the apk, please remember that you need to go to [Settings] and to have [Unknown sources] checked to allow the installation of non-Market apps).

We have two guest accounts for you to play the game: guest1 and guest2, their password is guest. If you want to start your own character and collect high level cards for your own character, you may register your own account online.

Publications.

Rita Kuo, Maiga Chang, Zhong-Xiu Lu, and Cheng-Li Chen. (2019). Student and teacher's perceptions toward the in-game card as educational reward (ICER) Moodle plug-in. Learning in a Digital World - Perspective on Interactive Technologies for Formal and Informal Education. Springer, 275-289.

Rita Kuo, Maiga Chang, and Cheng-Li Chen. (2018). In-game Card as Educational Reward (ICER) Moodle Plug-ins: A Pilot Study. In the Proceedings of the International Conference on Technology in Education, Hong Kong, January 9-11, 2018, 5-16. (Springer)(Excellent Paper Award)

Peayton Chen, Rita Kuo, Maiga Chang, and Jia-Sheng Heh. (2017). The Effectiveness of Using In-Game Cards as Reward. Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning, 12, Article #15. Retrieved from https://telrp.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s41039-017-0054-8 (Open Access)

Cheng-Li Chen, Yiyang Zhao, Anni Luo, Maiga Chang, Dongming Qian, Rita Kuo, Hung-Yi Chang. (2017). Educational Reward Moodle Plug-In. 21st Global Chinese Conference on Computers in Education (GCCCE 2017), Beijing, China, June 3-6, 2017, 211-218. (Best Student Paper Award Nomination)

Peayton Chen, Maiga Chang, Rita Kuo, and Jia-Sheng Heh. (2016). Trading Card Game. In the Workshop Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Computers in Education, Mumbai, India, November 28-December 2, 2016, 6-11. Retrieved from http://www.et.iitb.ac.in/icce2016/files/proceedings/ICCE%202016%20Workshop%20Proceedings%20Part%201.pdf

Peayton Chen, Rita Kuo, Maiga Chang, and Jia-Sheng Heh. (2009). Designing a Trading Card Game as Educational Reward System to Improve Students' Learning Motivations. Transactions on Edutainment, III, 116-128. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. (EI)

Our Team.

  • All Team Members
  • Current Team Members
  • Former Team Members

Dr. Maiga Chang

Project Lead & Principle Investigator

Full Professor

School of Computing and Information Systems

Athabasca University

Dr. Rita Kuo

Co-Principle Investigator

Instructor

Computer Science & Engineering

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (New Mexico Tech)

Eric Cheng-Li Chen

Leader Programmer (version 3) & Team Lead

MScIS Thesis Student

Athabasca University

Liliana Quyen Tang

Programmer (Responsive Web Design)

Research Assistant

Athabasca University

Chris Cameron

Programmer (Anti-Cheating and Anti-Hacking)

Research Assistant

Athabasca University

Philip Kirkbride

Programmer (Multi-Language Support)

Research Assistant

Athabasca University

Tales Henrique Carvalho

Programmer (Virtual Player)

Globalink Research Intern

Athabasca University

Peayton Chen

Leader Programmer (version 1 and 2)

MSc Thesis Student (graduated)

Chung-Yuan Christian University

Thomas Rollins

Programmer (Virtual Player)

Research Assistant & Undergraduate Project Student (graduated)

Athabasca University

Learn.

CARDS

The game is turn-based. Each player acts after the previous player finished his/her actions. When all the players take their turns, the circle will restart again from the first player. The game will stop when one of the players achieved the game goal – if his or her opponent's life point drops to 0. In the game, there are three kinds of cards: Avatar Card, Magic Card and Trap Card. The following table explains their definitions, effects, and attributes.

Card Categories Card Type Definition Related Attributes
Avatar Card Avatar Card Fight with other Avatar Card Attacking Power, Hit Point, Size, Race, Rank etc
Tool Card Magic Card Active: players can use it actively. Magic Card can alter Avatar cards' attribute values. Description/Effect, Duration, Rank, Scope etc.
Trap Card Passive: players can't use it directly; it will be triggered when opponent attacks.


GAME FIELDS

The following figure shows a five-star card – Silver Dragon. It has 30 Health Points and have very high Attacking Power (i.e., 15) and its Defending is also high enough (i.e., 7) when it is placed as defending position (please note that a card can not attack while at defending position; on the other hand, it can not defend itself while at attacking position). Silver Dragon is extra large (XL) which means its dead will make its player lose a lot of life points. As a dragon can fly, doesn't like most of Avatar cars, its attacking range is 2.

The following figure shows the game field, which has two sides for two players (and the game allows two additional players to join a combat as audience). Each side has four areas: Hand (H), Deck (D), Graveyard (G), and Field where two kinds of cards, Avatar Card (A) and Tool Card (T), can be placed.

Each player can place his/her Avatar Card into one of six places which are presented in three rows; the first row contains Ap1; the second row contains Ap2 and A p3 ; and the third row contains Ap4, Ap5 and Ap6. Each row makes a sense of "distance" to the others. Therefore, if an Avatar Card's "attack range" is shorter than the distance between it and its target, the player must "move" it first to make it closer to its target (but, the player can never move or put his/her Avatar Card into the opponent's game field of course).

At the beginning of the game, each player has certain life points (depends on the combat room settings that players did earlier), 30 cards in the Deck and can draw 6 cards from the Deck as the preparation. The goal is to reduce opponent's life points to be zero. On the other hand, if the opponent runs out of his/her cards in the Deck area, the player will also win the game. After both players get ready to start, one of the two players begins his/her first turn. Each player has 3 Action Points (APs) to spend for taking actions. When a player completed his/her turn (i.e., can not do anything further), he or she should click on the End Turn button and allows his/her opponent to play.

The following figure shows the real game field. We can see the two players are maiga and eric. It is the 3rd turn of their combat. They both have 5 life points. It is eric's turn, so he has 3 Action Points and he is now checking the cards he has in hands. Archaierai is a large card and has enough Health Points and its attacking power is also not bad.

Learn.

  • Cards
  • Game Field

The game is turn-based. Each player acts after the previous player finished his/her actions. When all the players take their turns, the circle will restart again from the first player. The game will stop when one of the players achieved the game goal – if his or her opponent's life point drops to 0. In the game, there are three kinds of cards: Avatar Card, Magic Card and Trap Card. The following table explains their definitions, effects, and attributes.

Card Categories Card Type Definition Related Attributes
Avatar Card Avatar Card Fight with other Avatar Card Attacking Power, Hit Point, Size, Race, Rank etc

The following figure shows a five-star card – Silver Dragon. It has 30 Health Points and have very high Attacking Power (i.e., 15) and its Defending is also high enough (i.e., 7) when it is placed as defending position (please note that a card can not attack while at defending position; on the other hand, it can not defend itself while at attacking position). Silver Dragon is extra large (XL) which means its dead will make its player lose a lot of life points. As a dragon can fly, doesn't like most of Avatar cars, its attacking range is 2.

The following figure shows the game field, which has two sides for two players (and the game allows two additional players to join a combat as audience). Each side has four areas: Hand (H), Deck (D), Graveyard (G), and Field where two kinds of cards, Avatar Card (A) and Tool Card (T), can be placed.

Each player can place his/her Avatar Card into one of six places which are presented in three rows; the first row contains Ap1; the second row contains Ap2 and A p3 ; and the third row contains Ap4, Ap5 and Ap6. Each row makes a sense of "distance" to the others. Therefore, if an Avatar Card's "attack range" is shorter than the distance between it and its target, the player must "move" it first to make it closer to its target (but, the player can never move or put his/her Avatar Card into the opponent's game field of course).

At the beginning of the game, each player has certain life points (depends on the combat room settings that players did earlier), 30 cards in the Deck and can draw 6 cards from the Deck as the preparation. The goal is to reduce opponent's life points to be zero. On the other hand, if the opponent runs out of his/her cards in the Deck area, the player will also win the game. After both players get ready to start, one of the two players begins his/her first turn. Each player has 3 Action Points (APs) to spend for taking actions. When a player completed his/her turn (i.e., can not do anything further), he or she should click on the End Turn button and allows his/her opponent to play.

The following figure shows the real game field. We can see the two players are maiga and eric. It is the 3rd turn of their combat. They both have 5 life points. It is eric's turn, so he has 3 Action Points and he is now checking the cards he has in hands. Archaierai is a large card and has enough Health Points and its attacking power is also not bad.

Instructional Videos.

  • All Videos
  • General
  • Flash game client v2.51 (English)
  • Flash game client v2.51 (Chinese)
  • Flash game client v2.51 (Portuguese)
  • HTML5 game client v3.0 (English)
  • HTML5 game client v3.0 (Chinese)
  • HTML5 game client v3.0 (Portuguese)

Trading Card Game as Educational Reward System

From Paper-based to Digital Game

The Pilot

[English] User Interface

[English] How to create and manage decks

[English] Create a combat room for playing

[English] A match (part 1)

[English] A match (part 2)

[Chinese] Select your language, login and logout

[Chinese] Create your own deck, change your nickname and password

[Chinese] Chat and create battle room

[Chinese] The Gameplay

[Portuguese] Select your language, login and logout

[Portuguese] Create your own deck, change your nickname and password

[Portuguese] Chat and create battle room


[Portuguese] The gameplay

[English] Select your language, login and logout

[English] Create your own deck, change your nickname and password

[English] Chat and create battle room


[English] The gameplay

[Chinese] Select your language, login and logout

[Chinese] Create your own deck, change your nickname and password

[Chinese] Chat and create battle room

[Chinese] The gameplay

[Portuguese] Select your language, login and logout

[Portuguese] Create your own deck, change your nickname and password

[Portuguese] Chat and create battle room


[Portuguese] The gameplay

Values.

Background

Past research shows that symbolically educational rewards are invaluable to students if chosen appropriately. Monetary rewards, however, are not encouraged for educational purposes. Additionally, students, regardless of ages and educational levels, tend to enjoy playing card games, though most of them are either commercial or particularly challenging to be used in educational settings. This trading card game therefore is intended to serve as a rewarding system for educational purposes through a variety of learning activities, including classroom participation, discussions, assignments, quiz, exams, to name a few. Importantly, we, instructors and students, which are intended end-users of the game, design the game bu ourselves. The game supports multiple languages, so players who use different languages can still play and compete with one another. each others.

Use Case

The game is a discipline independent game, which means, the in-game rewards can be delivered by any teacher in any course. The game is a sort of board game, therefore, the in-game rewards are cards and students need to compete with each other. In order to make students have correct perception and positive attitude towards the competitions, a student’s ranking among all students is based on his/her credits rather than how many matches s/he has won or lost before. The student can get credits for the efforts s/he has tried to make in the match, so s/he still receives credits even s/he loses the match, sometimes, a student who loses the game could even receive more credits than the winner. A student might be able to have more options and strategies in the match if s/he has more in-game rewards and even might be able to defeat his/her opponents easier. Well-designed peer competitions have been proved as a good way to get students motivated and it is the basic idea of this mechanism. For those students who don’t want to compete with others, the in-game rewards (i.e., the cards) have collectable feature just like coins, stamps and hockey cards; students may want to see higher level cards as well as rare cards in their card collection book. The effect of the game-based educational reward mechanism will be kept in student’s mind and the learning motivation engaged by the mechanism can be carried to the followed course. The students may want to get better in-game rewards in the followed course by learning harder and putting more efforts in the assignments, participation, discussions, and etc.

Want to use for your classes or school?

    Please send us, by email, a proposal which describes your thoughts and plan and also address the following questions:
  • (1) how do you plan to apply the game-based educational rewards to your classes/courses?
  • (2) what courses/classes, at which grade level, are planning to use this game?
  • (3) is there any long-term plan? For instance, can your students earn the cards from different courses at different level?
  • (4) how do you plan to apply the game-based educational rewards to your classes/courses?how do you plan to give your students cards as rewards? For instance, there are three different kinds of cards at five levels, which activity with what kind of performances you plan to give students which kind of cards at what level?

The game is at http://tcg.game-server.ca


Questions? If you have any question about the game, please contact Dr. Maiga Chang. We are pleased to help.

Contact Us.

If you have any question about the game, please contact:

  • Dr. Rita Kuo (rita.mcsl@gmail.com) or
  • Dr. Maiga Chang (maiga.chang@gmail.com).